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Marshall Football: Cramsey's journey to Huntington


HUNTINGTON, W. Va. (WCHS-TV/WVAH-TV) - From college quarterback at the University of New Hampshire to play-calling mastermind, Tim Cramsey's ride to Huntington has brought him through a number schools.

"I spent two years coaching high school ball. Went up to the University of New Hampshire for nine years where I worked up the ladder. I was tight ends coach for three, running backs for one, quarterback for one then offensive coordinator in year six. So three years as a coordinator at New Hampshire, one year at Florida International, three years at Montana State, one at Nevada, and now I have found a home here," Cramsey said.

But maybe Cramsey's biggest coaching takeaway came from his days as the quarterback for the Wildcats, where he was coached by now current UCLA head coach, Chip Kelley.

"Yeah, and I played for Chip. He wasn't the offensive coordinator when I was playing, but I played for Chip he was on the coaching staff. He remains a good friend of mine, and his offensive philosophy is something I learned and have taken from him," Cramsey said.

When an opportunity arose to return to UNH as an assistant under now OC Kelly, Cramsey jumped on board.

"It's been a blessing. The University of New Hampshire has a lineage. The program has two head coaches since 1974. Coach Kell is one of the guys and has helped me become the coach I am today," Cramsey said.

So even after coaching at multiple schools, the lessons learned from his time coaching at his alma mater, remain the most significant influence in the offensive scheme he now brings to Huntington.

"It's more philosophy thing from him. No coordinator is doing the right if they're married to an offense. It has to fit the personnel he has. So when the Tyre's, the Tyler's, the Keion's, Willie's, Marcell's and Obi's and those guys are playing, we're going to have different ways of getting them the ball in different situations and have them make us look like we're good coaches," Cramsey said.

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